The Four Fundamentals of Patient Care: Part I

The Four Fundamentals of Patient Care: Part I

By Judy Kay Mausolf

You may have heard the phrase, “They don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care!” I am blessed to work with dental teams nationwide to help them cultivate a happier, healthier and higher performing culture while delivering care with more focus and passion; however, the care part can often be vague and confusing. To better customize workshops to meet the practice’s needs, I send teams surveys for feedback on where they feel they excel and where they would like to grow. Most team members score themselves high at delivering excellent care—yet when I observe the team, I often find the opposite to be true. I have found this disconnect often stems from a difference of opinion or understanding about the meaning of care, which is why it is important for leadership (Doctor/Practice Administrator/Team Leads) to be on the same page and clearly define and model what it means to deliver exceptional care in their office.

Here is the first of four fundamentals that show our patients how much we care. Continue reading

Another Reason to Attend the Global Oral Health Summit: Onsite Support

If practice owners can take their team to only one educational event each year, how do they decide between the dozens, if not hundreds, of dentistry conferences and trade shows offered? Obvious reasons to attend one event over another include a strong educational program or valuable networking opportunities…maybe even a fun location that can fuel teambuilding. But what about technical support? Prioritizing a conference that offers technical support for the solutions already being used in a practice can help decisions makers narrow the field of which conferences to attend.

At Carestream Dental’s Global Oral Health Summit, being held Nov. 10-12, 2017, in Orlando, Fla., attendees can visit onsite support rooms for personalized one-on-one help from technical CS OrthoTrac, CS PracticeWorks, CS SoftDent, CS WinOMS and imaging software experts. The support team can address users’ biggest concerns and answer their most pressing questions in a casual setting. Software users can also attend software-specific hands-on courses led by certified trainers for additional insight into their practice management systems. At the end of the first day of programming, teams can reconnect with their peers in their specialty and hear directly from Carestream Dental leaders about what’s new for their specific software and also have their questions answered. Continue reading

The Four Cs of Getting the Most Out of Conference Education

The Global Oral Health Summit offers an educational program designed to arm attendees with new skills they can put into use in their practices right away.  From overviews of the latest industry trends to how-to courses geared towards software users, attendees will discover tips and tricks to increase efficiency; uncover new ways to tackle everyday challenges; learn new strategies for promoting their practices; and explore innovations in diagnostic techniques. Before you arrive in Orlando to start learning, consider these four “Cs” to get the most out of the education program:

Customize Your Experience
The Summit is fully customizable upon arrival. There’s no need to pre-register for courses, so attendees have the freedom to adapt their schedules to their needs and interests as often as they would like.

Choose Your Path

To keep teams on the cutting edge of industry standards, courses fall into the following relevant categories: Case Acceptance, Change Management, Efficiency, Marketing Your Practice, Practice Improvement, Practice Technology, Prevention, Team Building, and Digital Oral Health. Take the quiz  to determine which courses best fit your needs and interests. Continue reading

Five Things to Consider When Purchasing a CBCT System

The decision to add a CBCT system to your practice is a big one, largely because of the capital required. It isn’t like integrating a new laptop or tablet into your workflow. This kind of investment calls for careful consideration—particularly in five areas.

1.      Image resolution. The most important aspect of all: high image quality. Increasing your diagnostic capabilities is the number one reason to integrate CBCT technology into your practice in the first place. You need to be able to see your area of interest with unprecedented detail. But you also need to be able to adjust image quality with dose—so options for field of view are important.

2.      Versatility. What if you invest in CBCT imaging today and—six months down the road—you decide you want the ability to do cephalometric scanning? It would be nice to have a system that could expand with your capabilities, instead of having to purchase a whole new system. You should be able to take advantage of updates to your system when they become available, like for airway analysis, integration with CAD/CAM or low dose imaging. Continue reading

Atypical Anatomy: Tips on What to Look for in CBCT Data

While most of the scans you read will fall into the “normal anatomy” category, the logical next step in the journey of learning how to interpret data sets from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging is developing proficiency at deciphering anatomical variations. These variations can often be seen in intraoral and extraoral radiography, and it is sometimes helpful to use 3D radiography to fully understand certain variations; which otherwise could result in failure to diagnose.

One of the most common anatomical variations of a critical structure is the anterior extension/loop of the inferior alveolar nerve. Visualizing this structure is imperative when planning surgical procedures in the anatomical areas around mental foramen and the immediate area anterior to it.

Anterior extension of Inferior Alveolar canal: the red circle shows anterior extension and the yellow circle shows mental foramen

In addition to mental foramen, accessory foramen(s) can also be noted as a variation of normal anatomy in the mandible.

The temperomandibular joint (TMJ) area can exhibit wide variations in normal anatomy, which has to be correlated with clinical findings and additional imaging if necessary to establish the absence of any pathology. One of the most common variations can be the inter-articular space of the joint. This space may vary widely between contralateral joints of the same patient and between patients as well. The complexity of this anatomical region warrants a thorough review of all information available. Continue reading

Are Electronic Medical Records Right for Your Oral & Maxillofacial Practice?

By Gary Salman
Carestream Dental U.S. Director, Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery

When I talk to doctors who are still using paper charts in their practices, they all have one thing in common: they resist electronic medical records (EMR) because they’re certain that the switch from paper will be painful. While the transition is not a walk in the park, the challenges that EMR addresses make it a worthwhile effort. Consider these points: Continue reading

How to Streamline Communication through Automated Implant Reports

It’s easy to think of technological innovation in terms of the things we can hold in our hands—whether it’s the latest smart phone or the latest intraoral scanner. However, software—which isn’t quite as tactile—plays a huge role in simplifying our day-to-day lives, as well as workflows in the practice. Implant planning is currently experiencing a renaissance in innovation, and in addition to the hardware—scanners, CBCT systems, etc.—that is part of that change, software is also changing the way implants are planned, placed and even ordered.

According to Mark Setter, D.D.S., M.S., an automatic implant report can also help doctors better brand their practice, build relationships with referrals and even make things easier for patients who may be moving.

Being able to create reports for my referrals based on individual images and add my office logo and notations to the report is very easy to do. I am able to do it on the fly, without having to dedicate time to do reports—this is very powerful to me as a dental specialist. Even packaging up the DICOM files to send with a patient who is moving out of the area is just a couple of mouse clicks away. We just copy the data to a memory device or CD and send it to the future dentist, with no real effort on our part. Continue reading

Explore the 2017 Global Oral Health Summit [Interactive Infographic]

This year’s Global Oral Health Summit—held from Nov. 10-12—is moving to Orlando. And, while we know there are countless reasons you should register for this year’s event, we’ve worked hard to narrow down the list. Click on the image below to explore the top 10 reasons you and your team should register for the Summit.

Top 10 reasons to go to the global orla

Are there any reasons we missed? Let’s discuss in the comments section below.

Embracing Change to Give Your Practice a Competitive Advantage

By Ryan Estis
ryanestis.com

How a practice responds to change says a lot about the team that runs it. Do they embrace it? Seek it out? Avoid it? In this technological age, keeping up with the pace of change is crucial from a business and clinical perspective—patients make negative assessments about a practice based on outdated equipment, and using old technology may put a practice at a disadvantage when diagnosing patients. While adding new equipment is a step in the right direction, here are a few other ways you can view change around your practice that will give you a competitive advantage.

  1. Embrace change in the new economy—From imaging technology to the way we communicate with patients to how we accept payments, every aspect of the dental practice is changing. And that change is being driven by greater global trends that reflect how interconnected the world has become. Don’t think of yourself as one small practice, but part of a global business network. The changes you make now affect not only your practice but your patients, your community and, ultimately, the greater economy.

Continue reading

The Benefits of CBCT in Orthodontics

Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has infiltrated every dental specialty over the past few years, including orthodontics. In addition to aiding in the assessment of skeletal and dental structures, localizing and evaluating impacted teeth and supernumeraries and TMJ assessment, CBCT also plays a vital role in airway analysis, the planning of temporary anchorage devices, the fabrication of custom orthodontic appliance and digital model creation and storage. Other benefits include improved diagnoses, faster examinations and enhanced patient communication and case acceptance.

Diagnosis and Treatment

TMJ Assessment—CBCT systems with multiple fields of view give doctors the flexibility to assess temporomandibular joint changes, as well as the surrounding structures. Not only are CBCT scans more accurate than 2D imaging, but one 360 degree scan can capture both the right and left TMJ, thus simplifying patient positioning.

Airway Analysis—As airway analysis becomes more widespread in orthodontics, dedicated 3D imaging software will allow doctors to visualize constrictions by segmenting the airway in a few clicks. These visually appealing 3D images can also help doctors communicate with patients.

Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADs)—CBCT gives doctors a highly detailed overview of bone quality and quantity, the location of the sinuses and root proximity, all vital to know before considering placing TADs. Three-dimensional imaging software can also simulate implant placement  for increased confidence and a more accurate treatment planning. Continue reading