The Secret to Choosing the Right CBCT Unit [Video]

When it comes to cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging systems, there’s a number of bells and whistles to choose from. In this video, Jordan Reiss, Carestream Dental’s North American Sales Director for 3D Imaging, provides his advice on how to choose the right unit to meet your practices needs.

Whether you’re currently in the market for a 3D unit, or you already have one, what do you consider to be the most important criteria for choosing a system?

What Can Intraoral Scanners Do?

By David Claridge, CAD/CAM Product Specialist

Long, long ago (during the Gypsum Age), arriving on the silicone and polyether shores of merry England, was the first intraoral impression scanner. It was wheeled ashore behind a dozen horses and handed to a caveman called Claridge. He was the Product Specialist for a unit that shall not be named (unless to say it was tethered to a cumbersome trolley. Claridge drove up and down the country in a special car with ramp access to his little Trojan Horse strapped in the back, and preached to any who would listen about the benefits of digital impressioning.

But the good dentists of the land asked lots of “can it do [fill in the blank]?” questions. These questions are still asked today, but there is a palpable shift that marks the development and adoption of intraoral scanners. So while Claridge was going around gathering ‘can it do’ questions, little hobbits at Carestream Dental were listening to this voice of customer feedback and taking notice. The answers to these questions fell into three categories… “Yes,” “No,” and “Not today.” You see, change happens, and has happened. In those early days, the great majority of replies were either “No” or “Not yet.”

Today, the vast majority of the ‘can it do’ questions I now receive are answered with a resounding “Yes it can!” Can it scan without powder? Can I send my scan anywhere i.e. is it truly open? Is it in HD colour? Can I store digital study models and re-import if I need them? Can I move it from room to room, over several floors? Can it scan implant scan bodies? Can I mark the margins? Can I use it for partial dentures, splints, retainers, aligners, crowns, bridges? Yes! YES!! YES!!! Continue reading

Top Three Tips for Protecting Your Dental Practice [Video]

Have you ever worried about theft in your practice? Stop worrying and start protecting.

In this video, I share three things that you can do as a practice owner to guard against embezzlement in your practice.

A common sense approach can go a long way toward keeping your practice safe. Remember these three tips:

  1. Listen to your inner voice.
  2. Print and review your own reports.
  3. Be skeptical during the hiring process.

To learn more, go to www.dentalembezzlement.com or call  1-888-398-2327.

The Future of Digital Dentistry is Open, Faster and Smaller

By Jan Einfeldt
Clinical Director of Staplehurst Dental Practice

What’s important to patients is also important to dentists and vice versa. We all benefit from efficient processes that enhance comfort, accuracy and minimise stress.

From the patient’s perspective, dental impressions haven’t traditionally offered the most pleasant experience. The availability of digital intraoral scanners has changed this drastically, providing a much more comfortable alternative[i]. For dentists, intraoral scanners offer many benefits in addition to encouraging patient satisfaction. They also have the potential to enhance the professional workflow, simplifying the impression-taking process and making everything from capture to storage of impressions easier. Plus, you can’t lose digital impressions like you can in the post or in filing cabinets.

The simple fact is that not all of us are great at taking impressions. Slight movement or a momentarily lapse in concentration can cause a less-than-perfect impression. The intraoral scanner increases the accuracy of the impression significantly[ii] and studies have found that trueness and precision[iii] can vary from scanner to scanner. As quality of the impression now depends on correct use of the scanner rather than experience with materials, we could soon see other members of the team taking impressions, instead of the dentist. Continue reading

Computed Radiography vs. Digital Radiography: Which Is Right for Your Practice?

The answer isn’t necessarily one or the other. It might be a combination of the two.

If you’ve decided to transition away from film, it’s important to look at all of the computed radiography and direct radiography options available in order to consider the pros and cons of each. It’s an important decision—you want it to be an informed one.

Computed Radiography Digital Radiography
Resolution ·   Not as high as digital radiography ·   Considered the best image quality and comparable to high-speed film in many cases, improving your diagnostic accuracy
Speed of Acquisition ·   Faster than film, slower than digital, impacting workflow for inter-operative imaging and new patient /recall exams ·   Viewable in seconds, maximizing efficiency and productivity
Expenses ·   Variable, because plates are consumed over time

·   Easily damaged

·   No additional expense after initial purchase, other than warranty costs and disposable sheaths (because sensors are reusable and durable)
Similarity to Film ·   Film-like workflow, reducing training ·   Entirely different workflow, although user friendly, making training necessary
Quantity Needed for a Practice ·   One scanner; several plates, which can be used by more than one user at a time and later scanned ·   Several sensors of various sizes, depending on size of the practice and number of users
Size Options ·   Available in more sizes than DR ·   Available in sizes 0, 1 and 2
Patient Comfort ·   Multi-size options

·   Due to flexibility and thinness, considered more comfortable for small children and patients with anatomic limitations and/or strong gag reflexes

 

·   More comfortable than their predecessors (thanks to contoured design), but still may be intolerable for patients with anatomic limitations and/or strong gag reflexes

 

Continue reading

Going Digital: It’s Easier Than You Think

If you haven’t switched to digital radiography, it’s likely due to concerns like these:

  • Operational challenges
  • Cost
  • Staff retraining

The misconceptions about digital radiography dissuade many oral health professionals from making the transition. They focus on the immediate impact of equipment changes and stop there.

Do you fall into this category? If so, you may not realize the potential for digital radiography to advance your dental practice objectives.

Misconception Reality Next Step
“Digital radiography isn’t worth the cost of computerizing my backend.”

If treatment rooms are not already computerized, adding digital radiography may seem like an expensive option.

Two key points:
# 1 – Not all digital radiography products require a computerized operatory. For example, phosphor plate systems have a workflow similar to film but can develop images much faster and do not require a treatment room computer. Some digital sensors  work with portable computing / display options, such as a tablet.
# 2  – Computerizing your back office and networking a good practice management system can actually reduce overall operational costs in many ways
Don’t assume all digital radiography products won’t be adaptable to the technology level of your practice. If you aren’t planning to computerize your treatment rooms, ask about mobile solutions or digital radiography products with a workflow similar to film.
“Digital sensors are big, bulky and hard to position.”

Many dentists are afraid that digital intraoral sensors are harder to position than film and are more uncomfortable for their patients.

Today’s digital intraoral sensors come in a variety of sizes and can capture a wide range of images. They’re designed for comfort and easy placement.

 

Look for sensors that:

– Come in different sizes

– Can capture different types of images

– Have positioning systems that facilitate placement

“Digital radiography is too expensive.”

Some practices are hesitant to purchase digital radiography products because the initial costs are higher than film radiography’s.

The upfront cost of digital radiography is more than film. However, this is a one-time expense. And, if you consider the savings in time and consumables (film/chemicals), you may discover that you actually spend less in the long run. Compare your yearly spend on film/chemicals to the cost of digital radiography equipment. Depending on how many images you capture annually, you may save by making the switch.

 

What are your concerns about digital radiography? Or if you’ve already made the switch to digital, what advice do you have for practitioners who haven’t? Continue reading

Three Dental Technology Predictions for 2017 That Would Be Most Welcome

As the year comes to a close, Carestream Dental reached out to industry leaders asking for their predictions for oral health care in 2017. The chief editor of Dental Economics, Chris Salierno, D.D.S, had this to say:

By Chris Salierno, D.D.S, Chief Editor, Dental Economics

The way we practiced dentistry in 1955 was not all that different from 1965.  Ditto for 1965 to 1975, and so on until we reached the new millennium.  Sure, there were major innovations in technology and materials along the way, but they didn’t occur at the accelerated pace that they do today.  Now, compare how dentistry was practiced in 2005 to 2015, the same ten year span, and you’ll be able to identify significantly more advancements in the way we provide care.  This exponential growth in technology is not just unique to our profession and is observable in everything from cell phones to how we order a taxi cab.

Continue reading