Friday Dental News Roundup

Hello roundup readers and welcome to another week of the dental news roundup. As always, we have some great stories for your reading pleasure! Our first article up to bat is an interesting read on how the number of dental patients visiting emergency rooms in the US, continue to rise. Second up to bat is an interactive look into the history of dentistry. Last up, is a trending story in the news about a man that lost his ability form new memories after a routine root canal procedure. Take a second at the end of your busy week and read up on what’s trending. You will not be disappointed!

Number of Dental Patients Visiting Emergency Room Continues to Rise
Data from the American Dental Association has found that people looking for urgent treatment for dental problems has doubled to 2.2 million during a 12-year stretch ending in 2012. The statistics show that the American healthcare system spends more than $1.6 billion each year treating dental patients even though emergency rooms are not equipped to do so.

An interactive history of dentistry from the year 700
Take an interactive look into the history of dentistry from the year 700 and on. On this interactive tour you’ll find that in 1530, the first book devoted to dentistry was published in dentistry and in 1760 John Baker emigrated from England to set up the first dental practice in the US. I won’t spoil the rest, read on for more information on the most pivotal moments in dental history.

A baffling medical puzzle: How a man’s trip to the dentist cost him the ability to form new memories
A 38 year-old British patient has recorded almost no new memories since undergoing a routine root canal in 2005. According to his doctors, WO has been tentatively diagnosed with anterograde amnesia — the loss of ability to form new memories after a traumatic event. Think Drew Barrymore in “50 First dates.”

Which piece of dental history did you find the most interesting? Share your answers with us in the comments section below.

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