Using a Digital Workflow to Plan an Implant Case from Start to Finish

Delivering predictable restorative outcomes is essential in implant cases. Through advancements in 3D and CAD/CAM technology, oral surgeons are better able to use a complete digital workflow to plan a case, fabricate a custom abutment, and fabricate and insert the crown.

In the Implant Practice article below, I describe how I treated a patient who presented with a congenitally missing left mandibular second premolar as well as the efficiencies experienced through the use of an integrated digital workflow.

Overall, when compared with conventional dentistry, a digital workflow allows us to complete a case—such as this one—in fewer steps and with enhanced patient comfort and satisfaction in mind.

Running Patient Last Visit Report in CS SoftDent v16

Automated reports can eliminate the more cumbersome aspects of your practice management software. In particular, the Patient Last Visit Report offers a number of benefits to CS SoftDent users:

  • Staff can visibly compare workflow throughout a given period;
  • display active vs non-active patients; and
  • see an overview patients seen by a specific Provider.

The following steps will help you run this report, as well as save you and your team valuable time.

While in CS SoftDent, select reports from the top ribbon, hover the mouse over patients – side menu will show – and select Last Visityou can access this list while on any screen.

PLV1 Continue reading

Digital Alternatives and the Payoff to Your Patients and Practice

Many areas of the dental practice are now influenced or controlled by digital features. Most practices have already adopted some element of technology to help improve the efficiency of the business and the outcome for their patients. The majority, however, still have opportunities to integrate further digital alternatives.

Why haven’t practice owners converted to digital wherever possible? There are a number of reasons why, but they usually come down to two: cost and time. In comparison, the lucky few who have adopted digital dentistry are “innovators,” embracing technology to the fullest, and reaping the rewards.

Where is digital dentistry in the practice?

In the last few decades, digital options have become available in both the clinical and business side of dental practices, including:

  • Radiography
  • Shade matching
  • Photography
  • Computer-aided design and manufacture (CAD/CAM)
  • Diagnosis and analysis, such as detection for caries, temporomandibular joint and muscle disorders
  • Practice management

The latter, although it does not have a clinical application, is becoming increasingly important in this era, since records and reports are essential to meeting organizational and legal standards. Improvements in practice management software—and the range of products available—mean that practices are becoming more efficient as businesses. Continue reading