Four Steps to Mastering Social Media at GOHS

The Global Oral Health Summit is a dynamic opportunity for oral health practitioners and professionals to learn about the latest industry technology and expand their professional networks by interacting with colleagues from across the country and globe. Utilizing social media is a prudent way to take advantage of all the benefits the Global Oral Health Summit has to offer. Here are a few tips to amplify your Summit experience.

Follow – The official social media accounts of the Global Oral Health Summit are an excellent source to find the most up-to-date information about the program, location and venue accommodations for the 2016 Summit and beyond.

  • Before GOHS begins, you can find Facebook posts about the Summit’s featured subject matter experts and in-depth content related to the session subjects to help you determine which sessions meet your particular interests.
  • Follow the GOHS Twitter account during the Summit for real-time updates and tips from our keynote speakers Laura Schwartz and social media expert Jesse Miller.
  • When the Summit is over, the educational support doesn’t end. Whether you have decided to make an equipment purchase or implement new software, you can visit the GOHS social channels to find helpful resources that will make the transition easy.

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The Secret to Streamlined Implant Cases: The Digital Workflow

Implant placement has become the treatment of choice for completely and partially edentulous patients. With more and more implants being placed, keeping up with demand can be difficult. However, with the ability to make your laboratory workflow more digital, time can be saved to create a more cost-effective, high-quality outcome. 1

Implant-based treatment provides infinite possibilities to practitioners, but it often represents a more time- and cost-intensive solution compared to traditional therapy alternatives with conventional tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses. Reducing the overall clinical treatment and technical production time to achieve a reasonable cost-benefit ratio—in combination with a high-quality outcome—can bring benefits to all concerned. Time is saved by eliminating many of the steps, including pick-ups and chemical-based processes. The delivery of restorations is also quicker and there is less chance of having to provide remakes and returns with a digital workflow.1

Many labs have already started transitioning to a digital workflow, as increased demand, technology advances and the growing shortage of technicians creates an enhanced need for improved productivity. Single digital work steps have begun to infiltrate classical impression-taking procedures, dental master cast fabrication, lost-wax casting techniques and individual finalization of the restoration with hand-layered veneering ceramics. For many years, dentists have taken an impression, sent their prescription off to the laboratory and waited for up to two weeks for a finished restoration to be returned. The restoration could then need further adjustments, despite the best efforts of the dentist and technician. The development of a completely digital workflow has the potential to change the entire process. At first glance, the new systems may seem complicated, but ultimately digital solutions can drastically streamline procedures for both the dentist and lab. Nevertheless, although changes are growing in the field of implant prosthetic treatment, the result of this evolution is a mixed conventional-digital workflow. Continue reading

Baby, You Can Drive My CBCT System

In the 1950s, America saw the beginning of “car culture,” and today there are roughly 210 million licensed drivers in the United States. Driving is almost second-nature. However, if you’re used to driving a Volvo and I give you the keys to a Mercedes, it may take a moment or two of adjustments before you’re ready to cruise down the highway. It’s not because you don’t know how to drive; it’s just a matter of learning a new system.

A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system is not unlike becoming comfortable with a different make and model of car. I’ve been operating my system for years now, and can comfortably “turn on a dime” or “shift gears.” However, when I invite a referring doctor to “go for a drive,” e.g., share the 3D imaging software for collaborative cases or email a screenshot of a scan, there may be a bit of a learning curve. But once the general practitioner learns to properly view the scans, it not only helps me build stronger relationships with them, but allows for me to gain greater future referrals.

resportion-incisorFirst, CBCT allows me to view a patient’s anatomy in stunning 3D detail, and can reveal much more than what a traditional panoramic X-ray could. I share these CBCT scans with the referring doctor and usually get one of two responses—“Yes, good, proceed with treatment,” or “Your system showed you all that?! Tell me more…” Of course, it’s perfectly acceptable for the referring doctor to trust my judgment and go with my proposed treatment. However, there’s something to be said about the GP who wants to gain a better understanding of the CBCT findings.  Also, greater communication, increases the chances that future treatment will have less hurdles.

So if that’s the case, I take the time to meet with the general practitioner in person to go over the scan in more detail. For example, a CBCT can elucidate a proposed implant site with a buccal-lingual cross cross-sections for both horizontal measurements and for visualizing the distance from the crestal bone to the nerve canal.  My 3D imaging software is also easy to share, which gives the GP a bit more freedom to play around in the scan and take the CBCT for a “test drive.” Continue reading