Maximizing Your IRS Section 179 Tax Deduction: This May be the Best Time

If you’ve been on the fence about purchasing new digital equipment for your practice, this tax incentive might be all the justification you need to make the decision.

Section 179 of the IRS tax code is designed to support small businesses by giving them financial incentive to invest in their business and support the manufacturing sector that serves them. It is also intended to spur economic growth. With Section 179, business owners can deduct the full purchase price of qualifying equipment and/or software purchased or financed during the tax year. For 2016, that means up to $500,000, which is a large increase over previous years and can really make a difference to your bottom line.

2016 Section 179 Deduction
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Using Dental Technology to Boost Word-of-Mouth Referrals

Whether you need to encourage referrals because you are new to dentistry/the location or because the practice’s active patient database is looking a little quiet of late, there are many strategies that can be used to boost referral rates. Updating your practice’s equipment and devices is one useful option. By improving the patient experience and, therefore, encouraging word-of-mouth-marketing, as well as enhancing communication with patients and colleagues, cutting-edge technology can be used to differentiate your practice from the competition.

Educate and trust

It is agreed that imaging is an excellent tool for diagnostic and treatment planning purposes. It allows a “picture” to be understood by the clinician, with visualization that is not only better than ever before, but available in an instant. Further still, it is a highly effective way to communicate with patients and referring dentists. High-quality images can display the current clinical situation and then help to set expectations with regards to the next steps. In relevant cases, images can also facilitate discussions in complex cases. The discussion can take place with the patient whilst they are in the dental chair, making treatment more efficient for all. The patient has a better understanding and can quickly learn to trust the new dentist as he/she feels that they have “proof,” rather than just words. Continue reading

How Intraoral Scanning Brings Consistency to Your Oral Surgery Clinical Outcomes

The benefit of intraoral scanning has a little to do with easy impression capture and a lot to do with better clinical outcomes.

When oral health professionals incorporate a 3D HD intraoral scanner into their implant workflow, they can create their treatment plans virtually and execute them with more proficiency. The resulting outcomes are consistently more accurate and precise.

Read this white paper to explore the various ways that intraoral scanning facilitates oral surgery procedures. It examines:

  • Surgical uses of intraoral scanners
  • Conventional versus digital impressions in the implant workflow
  • Scanning for a standard abutment or a scanbody
  • Digital workflow for the lab
  • Scanning for guided surgery
  • Advantages of intraoral scanning
  • Return on investment

Intraoral Scanners: What They Could Mean for Your Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Practice also explores the benefits to be gained: enhanced communication with referrals, better outcomes for patients, greater patient loyalty and a healthier bottom line.

Download the whitepaper to discover how intraoral scanning can maximize the overall efficiency of oral surgical procedures:

 

Trueness vs. Precision—What’s the Difference?

Many manufacturers tout the trueness, or accuracy, of a digital intraoral scanner in the same breath as precision. While both are important features of any scanner, the two concepts are not interchangeable. According to a recent study1 published in PLOS ONE, an online scientific journal, “an intraoral scanner should possess high trueness…but also high precision.” Let’s take a look at the difference between the terms and why both are vital for the best digital impressions.

First, trueness is a scanner’s ability to scan an object and replicate it as closely as possible to the original item—in this case, teeth, gingiva, abutments, etc. The more accurate the scanner, the more likely the digital impression on the screen will mirror the patient’s actual teeth. Precision, on the other hand, is a scanner’s ability to produce the same results consistently. If you picture a target, an accurate shot would mean the arrow hit the bullseye; or at least came incredibly close. Precise shooting would result in a grouping of several arrows close together, though not necessarily near the bullseye.

Example of accuracy and precision on a bullseye Continue reading