The Four Cs of Getting the Most Out of Conference Education

The Global Oral Health Summit offers an educational program designed to arm attendees with new skills they can put into use in their practices right away.  From overviews of the latest industry trends to how-to courses geared towards software users, attendees will discover tips and tricks to increase efficiency; uncover new ways to tackle everyday challenges; learn new strategies for promoting their practices; and explore innovations in diagnostic techniques. Before you arrive in Orlando to start learning, consider these four “Cs” to get the most out of the education program:

Customize Your Experience
The Summit is fully customizable upon arrival. There’s no need to pre-register for courses, so attendees have the freedom to adapt their schedules to their needs and interests as often as they would like.

Choose Your Path

To keep teams on the cutting edge of industry standards, courses fall into the following relevant categories: Case Acceptance, Change Management, Efficiency, Marketing Your Practice, Practice Improvement, Practice Technology, Prevention, Team Building, and Digital Oral Health. Take the quiz  to determine which courses best fit your needs and interests. Continue reading

Five Things to Consider When Purchasing a CBCT System

The decision to add a CBCT system to your practice is a big one, largely because of the capital required. It isn’t like integrating a new laptop or tablet into your workflow. This kind of investment calls for careful consideration—particularly in five areas.

1.      Image resolution. The most important aspect of all: high image quality. Increasing your diagnostic capabilities is the number one reason to integrate CBCT technology into your practice in the first place. You need to be able to see your area of interest with unprecedented detail. But you also need to be able to adjust image quality with dose—so options for field of view are important.

2.      Versatility. What if you invest in CBCT imaging today and—six months down the road—you decide you want the ability to do cephalometric scanning? It would be nice to have a system that could expand with your capabilities, instead of having to purchase a whole new system. You should be able to take advantage of updates to your system when they become available, like for airway analysis, integration with CAD/CAM or low dose imaging. Continue reading

Atypical Anatomy: Tips on What to Look for in CBCT Data

While most of the scans you read will fall into the “normal anatomy” category, the logical next step in the journey of learning how to interpret data sets from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging is developing proficiency at deciphering anatomical variations. These variations can often be seen in intraoral and extraoral radiography, and it is sometimes helpful to use 3D radiography to fully understand certain variations; which otherwise could result in failure to diagnose.

One of the most common anatomical variations of a critical structure is the anterior extension/loop of the inferior alveolar nerve. Visualizing this structure is imperative when planning surgical procedures in the anatomical areas around mental foramen and the immediate area anterior to it.

Anterior extension of Inferior Alveolar canal: the red circle shows anterior extension and the yellow circle shows mental foramen

In addition to mental foramen, accessory foramen(s) can also be noted as a variation of normal anatomy in the mandible.

The temperomandibular joint (TMJ) area can exhibit wide variations in normal anatomy, which has to be correlated with clinical findings and additional imaging if necessary to establish the absence of any pathology. One of the most common variations can be the inter-articular space of the joint. This space may vary widely between contralateral joints of the same patient and between patients as well. The complexity of this anatomical region warrants a thorough review of all information available. Continue reading