Top 10 Tips for Successful Suturing (Video)

When it comes to suturing, it’s best to keep things simple. All dentists should know at least the three basic sutures: simple interrupted, figure-eight interrupted and continuous, with or without locks. Keep these 10 general principles in mind to improve your suturing. Tips include the proper way to grip the needle; how many ties are needed; and how to tie a surgeon’s knot:


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Determining Bone Density Using CBCT

You’ve heard the phrase, “quality over quantity,” but when it comes to implant treatment, both are equally important. Luckily for implantologists, advancements in technology now let us view the bone in 3D, saving time and taking the guesswork out of implant surgery.

In the video below, I’m able to view a cross section of a CBCT scan with my CS 3D Imaging software and share my “mental checklist” for determining bone quantity. Viewing the cross section also reveals the basic density of bone, which helps me to determine bone quality. Plus, I go over a few useful comparisons that you can remember when considering bone quality.

Bone quantity and quality plays a crucial role from the very beginning of implant planning. CBCT scans not only objectively reveal bone dimensions, but also let me know the density and maturity of the bone before I even begin to drill.

How do you determine bone quantity and quality? Do you have a case where you’ve had to reevaluate your approach to placing an implant after discovering the dimensions and quality of the bone?

3D Imaging as a Diagnostic Tool (Clinical Case)

A few years ago, an orthodontist referred a healthy young boy to my office for evaluation. Concerned that the teen’s maxillary left second molar was not erupting, the orthodontist sent the patient to me with three serial panorexes—each taken two years apart—to review. When I first saw the panorexes, I didn’t notice anything out of the ordinary. We even took our own panoramic image and, were unable to see anything.

Patient's Panorex

Patient’s Panorex

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Investing in 3D Technology: CBCT and ROI

By Dr. David Little

As a small business owner, I have to consider the return on the investment when purchasing capital equipment for my practice. So it’s only natural for me to carefully weigh the pros and cons of the investment before I decide to implement a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system into my office. After making these considerations, I determined that having a 3D imaging unit readily available could help my practice by:

  • eliminating the loss of revenue that comes with sending a patient to a third-party imaging center;
  • improving patient satisfaction (thus retaining patient base and garnering word-of-mouth referrals); and
  • increasing case acceptance through faster—and more confident—diagnoses and treatment planning.

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3D vs. 2D Imaging – Is the 2D Ceph Still Necessary? (Part 2)

By Matt Hendrickson, U.S. Orthodontic Director

Last week, we touched on the why orthodontists need a 2D cephalometric system in their office and the difference between the different units. This week, I want to discuss the tangible advantages of having a 2D cephalometric unit available in your office.

The key benefits of using true 2D cephalometric imaging, as opposed to cephalometric images reconstructed by a 3D unit include:

  • Elimination of motion artifacts through one-shot acquisition
  • Improved workflow
  • Ability to evaluate treatment response of patients who started treatment with a 2D ceph
  • Decreased legal liability

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3D vs. 2D Imaging – Is the 2D Ceph Still Necessary? (Part 1)

By Matt Hendrickson, U.S. Orthodontic Director

3D images are an important tool in today’s orthodontic practice. However, capturing cephalometric images is critical for evaluating treatment in orthodontics. To ensure that you are getting the most reliable radiographs possible—and to streamline your practice workflow—it’s important to choose the right imaging system for your office. While there are a number of units on the market that can reconstruct a cephalometric image from a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan, these can take a toll on your workflow as well as introduce legal complications into your practice. Wise practitioners are implementing CBCT systems that give them the flexibility of both 2D and 3D imaging. Continue reading

Carestream Dental in the News: Dental Economics

As part of my regular column in Dental Economics, I recently had the opportunity to speak with Dr. David Little out of San Antonio, Texas. As an implant dentist, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is very important when it comes to Dr. Little’s treatment planning and evaluation. However, his experience in selecting a unit was a little different than most dental professionals, as he operates a multi-disciplinary practice and had to consider the needs of all specialists during the buying process (spoiler alert: he ended up choosing the CS 9000 3D system).

Read the article in Dental Economics to learn more about how 3D imaging helped Dr. Little with:

  • diagnoses;
  • treatment planning;
  • practice return-on-investment; and
  • case acceptance.

Be sure to check back in June to read my interview with Dr. Mark Setter, a leading periodontist out of Metro Detroit.

CBCT and Accreditation

As dental professionals learn more about the many clinical uses of cone beam computed technology (CBCT) and the benefits of having an in-office system provides, the popularity of 3D imaging systems is growing—and with that, so are the requirements for accreditation. At the moment, the number of practices required to have CBCT accreditation is limited. Currently, it’s only necessary in situations where:

  •  the practice receives reimbursements for Medicare or Medicaid;
  • the practice is located in Minnesota; or
  • the practice is located in California.

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Making the Case for 3D Imaging: Implant Practice

by Dr. Darrell Bourg

After being involved in a four wheeler accident, a 25-year-old male came into my implant dentistry practice complaining of pain in the upper left side of his mouth. Initially, I captured a 2D periapical image, but saw nothing out of the ordinary. Because of this, I decided to take a CBCT scan to get the bigger picture.

3D Image 1

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Three Dimensional Basics: Pixels and Voxels

Most of us are already familiar with pixels; after all, one of the first questions that we may ask when picking out a digital camera or computer monitor is how many pixels it has.  When it comes to digital radiography, the pixels still apply, but are limited to two dimensional images, such as intraoral and extraoral radiographs. In three-dimensional radiography, such as CBCT imaging, the complimentary unit is referred to as voxel. Continue reading