Gain Exclusive Access to Carestream Dental Innovators and Shape the Future of Technology

User-centered design and the voice of the customer drives innovation at Carestream Dental. Designers, developers, researchers and product line managers are sent into the field to observe the day-to-day workflows of real practices. Once a product is in the development stages, industry leaders are invited to the company headquarters to put the technology through its paces to ensure engineers are working in the right direction.

At the Global Oral Health Summit—being held Nov. 9-11 at the Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center just outside Dallas, Texas—this focus on the end-user can be seen throughout the event. Not only was the educational program designed with the input of real software users, but Carestream Dental’s designers, developers and leadership will be onsite seeking feedback and insight from attendees on the future of Carestream Dental technology. Numerous unique opportunities have been included in the program to give attendees and Carestream Dental staff time to interact and discuss what’s up-and-coming in the oral health field. Continue reading

An Educational Program Designed for Attendees, by Attendees

User-centered designed has driven software innovation at Carestream Dental for the past several years, and listening to the voice of the customer has always played a key role in developing new products. The educational program for the 2018 Global Oral Health Summit is no different. When it came to assembling the program, Carestream Dental sought the feedback of past Summit attendees to learn more about what real users wanted to learn more about.

The expertise of Dawn Hill, Jan Odell, Angie Minks, Misty Mattingly, Jerilyn Bird, Barb Nissen, Carol Chambers and Barb Houser, all volunteers, were called upon to help the Carestream Dental team develop a carefully curated program and event experience. Along with user experience designers and trainers, the volunteers, reviewed all purposed sessions and provided valuable feedback to ensure the educational program would meet the needs of attendees by addressing the challenges real practices and teams face every day.

Ultimately—and in keeping with the workflow-based theme of the Summit, “Where Your Practice Meets Proficiency”—the courses selected for the Summit support one of the following concepts: Developing an Effective Dental Practice, Patient Engagement, Consultation, Case Acceptance, Patient Care and Treatment and Patient Billing and Patient Follow-Up. Continue reading

Are Your Dental Loupes Worsening Your Neck Health?

By Dr. Bethany Valachi, PT, DPT, MS, CEAS

Imagine spending $1,500 on new loupes and then developing neck pain—or your existing neck pain worsens. This is an all-too-common problem that I frequently encounter in my dental ergonomic consultations and among my dental students.   On the other hand, I have repeatedly seen well-designed ergonomic loupes that improve or completely resolve neck pain. So how do you know if your loupes are improving or worsening your health?

Of all the criteria for selecting loupes (working distance, frame size, scope position, declination angle, co-axial adjustment), declination angle is the most important ergonomic factor that can make or break your health.

Studies show that working with the neck flexed forward only 20 degrees or more for 70 percent of the working time has been associated with neck pain.  While no loupe systems provide completely neutral head posture (ear-over-shoulder), loupes with a steep declination angle may significantly improve operator working postures in dentistry, thereby lessening risk of musculoskeletal disorders and improving clinician comfort. Therefore, to prevent musculoskeletal injury, loupes should enable you to work with less than 20 degrees of neck flexion.

Continue reading

The Benefit of Implementing Planned Time-Outs

By William J. Moorhead, D.M.D.

To some people, “time-out” implies “sporting event.” To others, it means “parenting strategy.”

Time-outs have been used in medicine for several years. In surgery with the surgical team, time-outs verify such areas as:

  • Patient’s name
  • Date of birth
  • Consent form had been signed
  • Drug allergies
  • The kind of surgery being performed

In our practice, we use time-outs as a planned pause before the start of treatment to focus on safety and patient communication. Continue reading

Global Oral Health Summit: The Exchange Central

During a hectic day at a learning event, it’s common for teams to choose a designated spot to meet up and regroup between educational sessions. At the Global Oral Health Summit, that “designated spot” is Exchange Central. It’s more than a place to connect with team members, it’s a central location with software and support resources, local information and fun ways to relax and recharge.

Make a Pit Stop with the Practice Management Pit Crew
Attendees can look under the hood at some of the new and exciting changes coming to Carestream Dental software. The crew of software analysts and designers will be on-hand to showcase the investments and improvements taking place in Carestream Dental’s practice management systems.

Join The Exchange
Attendees can chat with a Community Expert to learn more about The Exchange, Carestream Dental’s free online users community. At The Exchange, users can ask questions, participate in polls and search for handy how-to guidance for navigating their software.

Summit Play
Get crafty with your hands or challenge others to a game of corn hole, giant Jenga or Connect Four in our Summit Play area. Continue reading

Designing Better Medical and Dental History Forms

By William J. Moorhead, D.M.D.

Can the design of your medical and dental history forms affect efficiency? Yes, definitely. In fact, a well designed form not only saves time, it can facilitate diagnosis and motivate your patients.

Today, most practice management systems have online forms, which enable patients to register and complete their medical and dental history in advance. This can streamline the appointment—but only if the forms are designed with the patient in mind. If you discover that patients are filling out the forms incorrectly or if they are omitting information, it’s likely time to rethink your forms.

When you develop the medical and dental history section of your forms, develop questions so that a “yes” answer requires the doctor’s attention. For example, change the question “are you satisfied with the color of your teeth?” to “would you like whiter teeth?” This approach can speed your review process, because you can quickly decipher where to focus your attention. Continue reading

Getting Patients to Say “Yes” to Dental Cases

by Dr. Mark Hyman

A young dental student was working with me in my office years ago. All day long, he repeatedly said, “How can your team get patients to say yes to so many cases? What’s the secret sauce?”

His questions astonished me until I realized this: what is obvious to me isn’t obvious to everyone. My way of practicing dentistry involves the use of fundamental human relations principles, and a lot of practitioners out there just don’t realize the importance of this. Here’s the premise: Stop telling people what they need; instead, listen to what they want.

We try to never use the word need in our practice. You need a crown; you need to floss; you need to stop smoking. Need is punitive. Let’s face it: for the most part, dentistry is elective. The better four-letter word is want. After all, it’s not enough to buy CBCT systems, or digital sensors or intraoral scanners. What good is that state-of-the-art technology if your patients don’t want you to use them? Continue reading

There’s No Business Like Story Business

by Eva Grayzel

What new tool can you use to market your business, or articulate what makes you stand out among the competition? TELL A STORY!

In business across the board, story is a buzz word. People don’t buy products; they buy stories—and emotional connections. Storytellers who can share their narrative in an engaging way have a leg up on the competition.

In the program I am presenting at the Global Oral Health Summit this November in Orlando, Fla., I will inspire you to understand the value of a great story: how to find the story that you—and you alone—are meant to tell and how to craft that story to build rapport and instill trust.

You can build relationships by tapping the power of story to evoke a connection and foster patient loyalty. Find the story that exemplifies your values and differentiates you from the practice around the corner. Continue reading

Just a Moment to Convert New Patients

By Dr. Leon Klempner

No matter where people go these days, their mobile devices bring the power of the internet with them. What does this mean for you, the practitioner? You have an open-ended opportunity for making an impression.

Imagine converting patients while they stand in line at the grocery store or while having brunch with friends. Why should they choose your practice?  If your services are not the least expensive, why would they pay more?

Our marketing consultancy, People & Practice, has helped doctors across the country take advantage of digital media to grab the attention of potential patients at these very moments. We do it with a mix of marketing strategies that include reputation management, social media engagement and Facebook advertising. Our focus is positioning your practice to compete on value, not cost.

Reputation management
When a Google search for local orthodontists/dentists reveals your website, you’re only halfway there. What actually entices a user to click on your practice over another? Google search results that include your business listing with five-star reviews and positive comments. That’s the kind of exposure that makes all the difference. A reputation management system can help capture positive reviews as well as intercept possible negative experiences before they end up online for all to see. Continue reading

The Four Fundamentals of Patient Care: Part III

By Judy Kay Mausolf

The first fundamental of showing your patients how much you care is “Know Them,” followed by “Don’t Judge” and “Show Empathy.” In the third and final installment of this blog series, I’d like to share the fourth fundamental: Resolve Complications!

4. Resolve Complications! Occasionally even the best teams have patient complications arise. It is important to address complications ASAP by being mindful of the energy and attitude you are bringing to the conversation. Focus on coming from a place or mindset of curiosity, care and concern. It is never about proving you are right and they are wrong. We never win by making a patient wrong. Regardless of what the concern is, start out by asking the patient “How can I help you?” Then stop and listen to what they have to say. Please don’t try to feel in the blanks or be defensive. Continue reading