Implants and CBCT

It is no longer a debatable fact that three-dimensional imaging is standard of care when it comes to the surgical component of implant placement.1 The key here is to understand the value of achieving the three-dimensional view, simply phrased as the depth component of the visual anatomy. CBCT images are valuable to understand the topography and—more importantly—the inner component of the osseous structures.

Although all the image stacks are very critical to forming an opinion of the anatomical region in consideration, it is the cross-sectional view that are the most used when it comes to virtual planning of implants. Surgeons are better able to appreciate the buccal-lingual dimension of the bone when viewing the cross sectional reconstruction of the scanned anatomical area of the jaws. While viewing this reconstruction and other multiplanar images, there are some key anatomical markers to be evaluated as a part of the visual assessment of the bone.

It is expected that the morphology of the edentulous areas varies not only between individuals, but in an individual’s oral cavity. Age is a critical factor in the change noted in the osseous structures. Another critical factor is time; the longer a patient stays edentulous, the more the probability of resorption of the alveolar crest. This leads one to note the following three (not limited to) critical changes in the jaws:

Examples of lingual undercut, knife edge ridges and ridge angulation. Continue reading

How Intraoral Scanning Brings Consistency to Your Oral Surgery Clinical Outcomes

The benefit of intraoral scanning has a little to do with easy impression capture and a lot to do with better clinical outcomes.

When oral health professionals incorporate a 3D HD intraoral scanner into their implant workflow, they can create their treatment plans virtually and execute them with more proficiency. The resulting outcomes are consistently more accurate and precise.

Read this white paper to explore the various ways that intraoral scanning facilitates oral surgery procedures. It examines:

  • Surgical uses of intraoral scanners
  • Conventional versus digital impressions in the implant workflow
  • Scanning for a standard abutment or a scanbody
  • Digital workflow for the lab
  • Scanning for guided surgery
  • Advantages of intraoral scanning
  • Return on investment

Intraoral Scanners: What They Could Mean for Your Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Practice also explores the benefits to be gained: enhanced communication with referrals, better outcomes for patients, greater patient loyalty and a healthier bottom line.

Download the whitepaper to discover how intraoral scanning can maximize the overall efficiency of oral surgical procedures:

 

Using a Digital Workflow to Plan an Implant Case from Start to Finish

Delivering predictable restorative outcomes is essential in implant cases. Through advancements in 3D and CAD/CAM technology, oral surgeons are better able to use a complete digital workflow to plan a case, fabricate a custom abutment, and fabricate and insert the crown.

In the Implant Practice article below, I describe how I treated a patient who presented with a congenitally missing left mandibular second premolar as well as the efficiencies experienced through the use of an integrated digital workflow.

Overall, when compared with conventional dentistry, a digital workflow allows us to complete a case—such as this one—in fewer steps and with enhanced patient comfort and satisfaction in mind.