Implants and CBCT

It is no longer a debatable fact that three-dimensional imaging is standard of care when it comes to the surgical component of implant placement.1 The key here is to understand the value of achieving the three-dimensional view, simply phrased as the depth component of the visual anatomy. CBCT images are valuable to understand the topography and—more importantly—the inner component of the osseous structures.

Although all the image stacks are very critical to forming an opinion of the anatomical region in consideration, it is the cross-sectional view that are the most used when it comes to virtual planning of implants. Surgeons are better able to appreciate the buccal-lingual dimension of the bone when viewing the cross sectional reconstruction of the scanned anatomical area of the jaws. While viewing this reconstruction and other multiplanar images, there are some key anatomical markers to be evaluated as a part of the visual assessment of the bone.

It is expected that the morphology of the edentulous areas varies not only between individuals, but in an individual’s oral cavity. Age is a critical factor in the change noted in the osseous structures. Another critical factor is time; the longer a patient stays edentulous, the more the probability of resorption of the alveolar crest. This leads one to note the following three (not limited to) critical changes in the jaws:

Examples of lingual undercut, knife edge ridges and ridge angulation. Continue reading

The Possibilities are Limitless

Technology, trends and techniques are constantly changing. With that in mind, Carestream Dental asked a number of experts about their opinions on what oral health care professionals should be on the lookout for in 2017. Here’s what Lisa Moler, publisher of MedMark, had to say:

By Lisa Moler, Publisher, MedMark, LLC

Staying current on dental trends is both exhilarating and challenging for MedMark’s dental journals, Implant Practice US, Orthodontic Practice US, Endodontic Practice US and Dental Sleep Practice. Latest and greatest technologies keep evolving at mind-blowing rates, allowing diagnostic and treatment options to become safer and more efficient—while staying within a reasonable budget.

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How Intraoral Scanning Brings Consistency to Your Oral Surgery Clinical Outcomes

The benefit of intraoral scanning has a little to do with easy impression capture and a lot to do with better clinical outcomes.

When oral health professionals incorporate a 3D HD intraoral scanner into their implant workflow, they can create their treatment plans virtually and execute them with more proficiency. The resulting outcomes are consistently more accurate and precise.

Read this white paper to explore the various ways that intraoral scanning facilitates oral surgery procedures. It examines:

  • Surgical uses of intraoral scanners
  • Conventional versus digital impressions in the implant workflow
  • Scanning for a standard abutment or a scanbody
  • Digital workflow for the lab
  • Scanning for guided surgery
  • Advantages of intraoral scanning
  • Return on investment

Intraoral Scanners: What They Could Mean for Your Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Practice also explores the benefits to be gained: enhanced communication with referrals, better outcomes for patients, greater patient loyalty and a healthier bottom line.

Download the whitepaper to discover how intraoral scanning can maximize the overall efficiency of oral surgical procedures:

 

The Secret to Streamlined Implant Cases: The Digital Workflow

Implant placement has become the treatment of choice for completely and partially edentulous patients. With more and more implants being placed, keeping up with demand can be difficult. However, with the ability to make your laboratory workflow more digital, time can be saved to create a more cost-effective, high-quality outcome. 1

Implant-based treatment provides infinite possibilities to practitioners, but it often represents a more time- and cost-intensive solution compared to traditional therapy alternatives with conventional tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses. Reducing the overall clinical treatment and technical production time to achieve a reasonable cost-benefit ratio—in combination with a high-quality outcome—can bring benefits to all concerned. Time is saved by eliminating many of the steps, including pick-ups and chemical-based processes. The delivery of restorations is also quicker and there is less chance of having to provide remakes and returns with a digital workflow.1

Many labs have already started transitioning to a digital workflow, as increased demand, technology advances and the growing shortage of technicians creates an enhanced need for improved productivity. Single digital work steps have begun to infiltrate classical impression-taking procedures, dental master cast fabrication, lost-wax casting techniques and individual finalization of the restoration with hand-layered veneering ceramics. For many years, dentists have taken an impression, sent their prescription off to the laboratory and waited for up to two weeks for a finished restoration to be returned. The restoration could then need further adjustments, despite the best efforts of the dentist and technician. The development of a completely digital workflow has the potential to change the entire process. At first glance, the new systems may seem complicated, but ultimately digital solutions can drastically streamline procedures for both the dentist and lab. Nevertheless, although changes are growing in the field of implant prosthetic treatment, the result of this evolution is a mixed conventional-digital workflow. Continue reading

Making a Bad Impression: A Step-by-Step Guide for Traditional Impressions

If you’re an avid reader of the blog, you’re sure to know the benefits of intraoral scanners and digital impressions. Intraoral scanners are less messy than traditional impressions; require fewer consumables; provide a more comfortable experience for patients; help practices build better relationships with labs; and result in faster turnaround from scan to appliance or restoration. But, in the spirit of being balanced, we’ve decided to focus on how to take traditional impressions for a change… Continue reading

Top 10 Tips for Successful Suturing (Video)

When it comes to suturing, it’s best to keep things simple. All dentists should know at least the three basic sutures: simple interrupted, figure-eight interrupted and continuous, with or without locks. Keep these 10 general principles in mind to improve your suturing. Tips include the proper way to grip the needle; how many ties are needed; and how to tie a surgeon’s knot:


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The Many Uses for Digital Scanners in the Field of OMS

I’m sure you’ve heard the buzz around intraoral scanners from general dentists and orthodontists— computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, or CAD/CAM, technology is changing dentistry—but how does this cutting-edge technology relate to your practice as an oral surgeon? Let me share with you a few of the ways that I have integrated digital scanning into my practice.

First, a little background: intraoral scanners take the place of conventional or analog impressions. Instead of trays, alginate or polyvinyl and pouring molds, the scanner captures digital images of a patient’s teeth, which are available almost instantly on a computer screen. These image files are then shared with a lab to create models. Also, digital scanners are small and lightweight and the more sophisticated scanners can be simply unplugged from a laptop and taken from operatory to operatory. Continue reading