2018 Predictions: Disrupting the Oral Health Industry

Offering innovative technology paired with responsive support is a critical requirement modern oral health practitioners expect leading dental companies to fulfill. Bart Silverman, D.M.D., reveals more business necessities essential to the evolving industry.

 

How have the broader possibilities in the oral health industry changed the way you purchase equipment and software for your practice?

The opinions expressed on the blog are a reflection of the author and not an endorsement from Carestream Dental.

How Intraoral Scanning Brings Consistency to Your Oral Surgery Clinical Outcomes

The benefit of intraoral scanning has a little to do with easy impression capture and a lot to do with better clinical outcomes.

When oral health professionals incorporate a 3D HD intraoral scanner into their implant workflow, they can create their treatment plans virtually and execute them with more proficiency. The resulting outcomes are consistently more accurate and precise.

Read this white paper to explore the various ways that intraoral scanning facilitates oral surgery procedures. It examines:

  • Surgical uses of intraoral scanners
  • Conventional versus digital impressions in the implant workflow
  • Scanning for a standard abutment or a scanbody
  • Digital workflow for the lab
  • Scanning for guided surgery
  • Advantages of intraoral scanning
  • Return on investment

Intraoral Scanners: What They Could Mean for Your Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Practice also explores the benefits to be gained: enhanced communication with referrals, better outcomes for patients, greater patient loyalty and a healthier bottom line.

Download the whitepaper to discover how intraoral scanning can maximize the overall efficiency of oral surgical procedures:

 

Using CBCT to Present “Scary” Treatment Plans

Very few people like to visit the dentist. Now, imagine how much less they like visiting an oral surgeon. In the patient’s mind, surgery involves scalpels, anesthesia and recovery time—it’s far more involved than the biannual dental prophy. However, I’ve found when it comes to a “scary” treatment, such as an autogenous bone graft, using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) helps me calm the fears and address the concerns of my patients. Not only that, CBCT improves patient understanding of their treatment and can increase case acceptance.

Borrowing Bone “in the Neighborhood”

Let’s say that a patient is interested in implants. However, a CBCT scan, which lets me view the oral cavity in 3D from any angle, reveals there isn’t enough bone present. To proceed with treatment, an autogenous bone graft is necessary. When discussing bone grafts with patients, their response is typically: “Gosh, that sounds terrible; taking bone from one part of my body to another?!” However, as I’ve discussed previously, the accuracy of CBCT reveals possible donor sites within the same maxillofacial region. It’s almost like moving a puzzle piece from one area of the puzzle and snapping it in to another area to make it fit. I reassure the patient by explaining: “Actually, we’re going to borrow a little bit of your own bone while I’m ‘in the neighborhood’.” That sounds far better to a patient than informing them we’re going to go to their hip or leg to take bone. Continue reading

The Value of CBCT in Autogenous Bone Grafting

When placing implants, I try to answers the questions of “how many,” “where” and “what size.” When asking “where,” bone volume plays a huge role. If I find bone deficiencies or inadequacies at the implant site, the treatment plan can go from very basic to very involved, as an autogenous bone graft may be necessary. Fortunately, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) lets me view multiple planes in 3D. It not only reveals if there is a need to regenerate or augment bone, but also helps me identify possible donor sites for a bone graft.

The “Gold Standard”

Of course, there are is a cache of treatment options—autogenous, bone substitutes, ridge splitting, guided bone regeneration, block grafting, tissue engineering, mesh, etc—but for an oral surgeon the gold standard is the autogenous bone graft. A bone graft can stabilize the jaw, correct deformities and preserve the jaw in preparation for the next step of treatment, i.e., the implant. Continue reading

The Many Uses for Digital Scanners in the Field of OMS

I’m sure you’ve heard the buzz around intraoral scanners from general dentists and orthodontists— computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, or CAD/CAM, technology is changing dentistry—but how does this cutting-edge technology relate to your practice as an oral surgeon? Let me share with you a few of the ways that I have integrated digital scanning into my practice.

First, a little background: intraoral scanners take the place of conventional or analog impressions. Instead of trays, alginate or polyvinyl and pouring molds, the scanner captures digital images of a patient’s teeth, which are available almost instantly on a computer screen. These image files are then shared with a lab to create models. Also, digital scanners are small and lightweight and the more sophisticated scanners can be simply unplugged from a laptop and taken from operatory to operatory. Continue reading

3D Imaging as a Diagnostic Tool (Clinical Case)

A few years ago, an orthodontist referred a healthy young boy to my office for evaluation. Concerned that the teen’s maxillary left second molar was not erupting, the orthodontist sent the patient to me with three serial panorexes—each taken two years apart—to review. When I first saw the panorexes, I didn’t notice anything out of the ordinary. We even took our own panoramic image and, were unable to see anything.

Patient's Panorex

Patient’s Panorex

Continue reading