There’s No Business Like Story Business

by Eva Grayzel

What new tool can you use to market your business, or articulate what makes you stand out among the competition? TELL A STORY!

In business across the board, story is a buzz word. People don’t buy products; they buy stories—and emotional connections. Storytellers who can share their narrative in an engaging way have a leg up on the competition.

In the program I am presenting at the Global Oral Health Summit this November in Orlando, Fla., I will inspire you to understand the value of a great story: how to find the story that you—and you alone—are meant to tell and how to craft that story to build rapport and instill trust.

You can build relationships by tapping the power of story to evoke a connection and foster patient loyalty. Find the story that exemplifies your values and differentiates you from the practice around the corner. Continue reading

The Four Fundamentals of Patient Care: Part III

By Judy Kay Mausolf

The first fundamental of showing your patients how much you care is “Know Them,” followed by “Don’t Judge” and “Show Empathy.” In the third and final installment of this blog series, I’d like to share the fourth fundamental: Resolve Complications!

4. Resolve Complications! Occasionally even the best teams have patient complications arise. It is important to address complications ASAP by being mindful of the energy and attitude you are bringing to the conversation. Focus on coming from a place or mindset of curiosity, care and concern. It is never about proving you are right and they are wrong. We never win by making a patient wrong. Regardless of what the concern is, start out by asking the patient “How can I help you?” Then stop and listen to what they have to say. Please don’t try to feel in the blanks or be defensive. Continue reading

The Four Fundamentals of Patient Care: Part I

The Four Fundamentals of Patient Care: Part I

By Judy Kay Mausolf

You may have heard the phrase, “They don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care!” I am blessed to work with dental teams nationwide to help them cultivate a happier, healthier and higher performing culture while delivering care with more focus and passion; however, the care part can often be vague and confusing. To better customize workshops to meet the practice’s needs, I send teams surveys for feedback on where they feel they excel and where they would like to grow. Most team members score themselves high at delivering excellent care—yet when I observe the team, I often find the opposite to be true. I have found this disconnect often stems from a difference of opinion or understanding about the meaning of care, which is why it is important for leadership (Doctor/Practice Administrator/Team Leads) to be on the same page and clearly define and model what it means to deliver exceptional care in their office.

Here is the first of four fundamentals that show our patients how much we care. Continue reading

Making a Bad Impression: A Step-by-Step Guide for Traditional Impressions

If you’re an avid reader of the blog, you’re sure to know the benefits of intraoral scanners and digital impressions. Intraoral scanners are less messy than traditional impressions; require fewer consumables; provide a more comfortable experience for patients; help practices build better relationships with labs; and result in faster turnaround from scan to appliance or restoration. But, in the spirit of being balanced, we’ve decided to focus on how to take traditional impressions for a change… Continue reading

Controlling the Conversation: How the Right Technology Adds Value to Your “Voice”

Doctors have long been the trusted, authoritative voice on all things related to oral health. Patients relied on our years of training and accepted treatment without much question. These days, technologically-savvy patients aren’t interested in a monologue from their doctor; they want to join the conversation. Not only do they demand a two-way dialog—a perfectly reasonable request that should be encouraged, we want our patients to ask question and understand their treatment—but websites like WebMD and online forums now have patients “crowd sourcing” the best treatment options. That means the conversation between you and your patient can quickly become a figurative shouting match between you, the patient and everyone the patient chatted with on the “The Worst Things that Can Go Wrong during a Root Canal” forum.

However, no matter how many online articles the patient reads; forums they visit for advice; or symptoms they self-diagnose based on a Google search, the doctor is the expert. But how do we let our voices be heard? I recommend we not only “talk the talk,” but “walk the walk” by demonstrating to our patients our expertise and dedication to their care with the safest, most advanced imaging technology.

Continue reading

It’s About the People

(This is an updated version of an article I published in 2009)

It’s not about the machine, it’s about the people. But sometimes the machine can make all the difference.

It is easy to see technology just as machines and networks but I have always believed the real significance, the real value of technology comes when we use it to improve the human condition. Dr. Tony Romanazzi, a dentist from Glens Falls, New York in the Hudson River Valley, told me a lovely story that demonstrates this idea perfectly.

Dr. Romanazzi was asked by a long time patient if he would see a relative of hers, a special needs patient we will call Jimmy. Jimmy was a mentally handicapped man in his fifties who functioned about on the level of a two or three year old. That is he could say a few words and get around the house but could not really care for himself. Jimmy had been complaining that his teeth hurt. His care givers had tried to find him some help but so far no one had been able to do much. Continue reading

In-Office Dental Restorations: Benefits to Patients (Chart)

Delivering a superior patient experience is important to every dental practice. Through offering personalized care that (a) solves a problem (b) quickly and without extra effort on behalf of the patient, practitioners can effectively meet their business goals, such as:

  • patient retention;
  • word-of-mouth referrals;
  • improved employee morale; and
  • increased case acceptance (and office revenue).

One of the ways I have sought to improve patient care in my office is by offering in-office CAD/CAM restorations. By prepping the tooth, scanning the arch, designing the crown, milling the crown and then placing the finished crown within one appointment, I have found that my patients are happier with me and my staff—not to mention healthier. Continue reading